Would you survive a real life street fight?
Click here to Take the Combat Quiz Now!

Lesson Five of the Self Defense Mini Clinic

Click here to see Lesson 4.

This lesson teaches you how to train and develop the skills and principles you’ve learned and will learn in the future from Fightfast.com.

But before we dive in, check out this triangle choke hold taught by decorated soldier and former Delta Force Operator Jim West.


Training Methods:

A complete review of proper training and conditioning methods for combat is beyond the scope of this book, however, I do want to point out that the average guy looking to defend himself on the street doesn’t need to endure a lifetime of training.

On the contrary, the entire purpose of my many DVD packages is to simplify everything. I’ve received emotional letters from dozens of customers who simply watched a certain program, did NO training, and were able to recall and use it correctly when they needed it. Doesn’t get much better than that. But if you’re serious about implanting this information deeply into your body, you’ll want to consider training it.

Street fighting does not require the same level or type of conditioning as sport fighting. Surprisingly, cardiovascular endurance isn’t a significant factor in a street fight. I know this is a controversial claim, but research and 20 years of study and observation backs it up.

Remember, true street fights (as opposed to mutually agreed combat) rarely last longer than 10 seconds. Understanding and employing the 4 D’s (Deception… Distraction… Disruption… Destruction), will trump cardiovascular conditioning.

So with that in mind, having the ability to initiate and maintain continuous explosive action for 8 to 10 seconds will give you a huge advantage in a fight. Design your training accordingly.

For street fighting focus your training on anaerobic conditioning (strength and power training). Eight to ten seconds may not seem very long, but try going all out on a heavy bag for that amount of time…it’s pretty tough.

The more realistic you train the better. This includes the emotional component as well. Here are some tips:

    • 1.) Practice initiating a pre-emptive attack and counter attack from multiple positions and stances. If you practice the 4 D’s you won’t be initiating the attack from a classic boxer’s stance. More than likely your hands will be up, open, and forward in an “I don’t want any trouble” submissive posture. This is the position you want to practice launching from.

self defense training focus mit

  • 2.) Practice maintaining a constant barrage. And if training with a partner, maintain constant forward pressure. Constant Barrage is more important than Strike Accuracy. Practice Target awareness. If working on a heavy bag, imagine different targets being made available, if working with a partner, make sure he or she offers you a variety of targets to attack.
  • 3.) Practice your verbiage as you initiate an attack as well as anything you might say during the attack. Make it as real as possible. If you are working with a training partner have your partner play the part; yelling, threatening, cursing, etc. His goal should be to drive up the emotional content as much as possible.
  • 4.) Develop a “Strike” mentality – Start hitting a heavy bag. A partner with “strike mitts” is even better, because it allows you to get used to movement. Practice striking with your hands, elbows, shoulders, head, and knees and mix up “Hi-Line” shots (at the head and chest) and “Lo-Line” shots (at the stomach, ribs, groin and legs).
  • 5.) Get a “Battle Cry” – As I just discussed, this does a couple things. First it throws off your adversary for a couple of crucial seconds at the beginning of your action sequence. His brain will be burning up valuable seconds trying to process what all the yelling is about (“what the hell…”) while your attack is under way. Very effective.The second function of the battle cry is to prompt your brain into action. There’s a big difference between thinking about taking action and actually taking action, and it’s easy for most people to get “locked down” in planning. Your brain needs a kick in the butt to transfer its energy from the thinking and planning mode into the action mode.

The battle cry is a verbal “go” that’s imperative to getting yourself moving forward. It’s nothing new, soldiers have been using this for thousands of years as a way to overcome freezing and to strike fear in their enemies. But you’ll want to use this verbal battle cry in training ONLY when you launch into an attack so that it holds power and is an “internal trigger.”

The next training principle is proper execution. Few moves require better execution than weapon disarms. In the following video, you’ll learn the correct technique to disarm an attacker with a gun. A situation we all hope to god we never find ourselves in, but one where the right technique is the difference between life and death.


  • 6.) Always practice proper execution: Watching countless videos of actual street fights as they happened has only cemented what my research has already strongly suggested that real-world fighting is sloppy. It is the rare exception for a fighter to properly execute a complex martial arts move.This is why it’s important to practice proper execution as you’ll be more likely to retain a percentage of it when “crunch time” hits. As expert shooter Bennie Cooley points out, if you can group your shots with 3 inches of each other during practice, you may just retain a grouping the size of a paper plate in real combat (which is considered excellent shooting in the real world). Or as Bruce Lee once pointed out: “I do not fear the man who has practice 1000 kicks one time… I fear the man who has practiced one kick 1000 times.”But Bruce was a little off in his numbers. Studies show that it takes about 2,000 repetitions of a move before it’s actually “implanted” into your brain’s neural pathway for easy recall even under stress. Now 2,000 sounds like a big number, but it’s not. The key is to practice a move correctly.Here is a proven method for developing your skills.Level 1:
    1. Practice a move in front of a mirror slowly. This allows you to “self correct” anything you’re doing wrong. Keep practicing until you are satisfied that your technique is correct.
    2. Practice the same move in front of mirror at full speed. Again… this allows you the opportunity to self correct.
    3. Try it again… this time in slow motion with your eyes closed. You’ll want to periodically sneak a peek in the mirror to see if you’re still on track with your technique.
    4. When your satisfied with your technique, perform it at full motion with your eyes closed. This will start hardwiring the move into your muscle memory.

    Self Defense Training Heavy BagLevel 2: Get your hands on a heavy bag… they’re not expensive and the exercise value alone that you’ll receive it is worth every penny.

    1. Now practice the same move on heavy bag – slowly. Use a mirror again if you can to periodically check your technique. If you see that it’s flawed, go back to Level 1.
    2. Practice the technique on heavy bag at full speed. Try to visualize how you’d use the move on specific target areas.

    Level 3: Practice with a partner. Now I realize not all of us have someone willing to act as your punching bag, but for those who are committed to taking their skills to an expert level, having a live person to practice on is important. For any specific move you want to:

    1. Practice with partner slowly… then when you’re both comfortable….
    2. Practice with partner at full speed.

Of course this is only a brief description of how to train. The DVDs will take you through specific moves and techniques in detail. But it’s important to remember to always be careful with your partner, especially if you’re just getting started. Make sure your partner understands how to “tap-tap-tap” on your side whenever they feel uncomfortable.

Most of the moves you’ll discover are ones that can be used “straight out of the box.” They’re almost always simple, easy to learn, and devastating, so you must use care during any practice. Avoid “showing off” your new moves to unsuspecting friends or family members as it’s easy to put them in the hospital or permanently injure (even kill) them.

That’s it for the free Self Defense Mini Clinic, but don’t worry I’ll still be in touch. I’ll be sending you chapters of the full length fight guide (this Self Defense Mini Clinic was a condensed version) and video tips from my blog every week. So keep your eyes peeled for more free fighting instruction.

Interested in learning brutal self defense right away?
As a graduate of my 5 Day Course I’ve Arranged A One-Time Killer Deal For You!

<< Previous Lesson

Leave A Reply:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

389 thoughts on “Lesson Five of the Self Defense Mini Clinic”

  1. Simple effective methods of regaining the initiative but requires regular and continual practice until it becomes instinctive

  2. These moves are natural and easy. This is the best self defense clinic ever heard of. You don’t have to be strong necessarily or even fit. Just be able to fight hard, fast, and continuously for a short 8 seconds or so and to be able to get away fast from your attacker.

  3. Even though I’m not a fighter at heart, don’t get me cornered, cause I’m coming out even if I’m bleeding,hurt or madder than hell. I generally try to talk my way out, but if that doesn’t work…well, the fight is on.
    I can learn from the videos I just watched. Of course I would never want to start anything cause that would be stupid.
    For protection though, the videos are excellent.

    Thanks

  4. Very good verbal and video training. Keep it simple. One has to practice with a buddy (or – in my case – with my sons). In a situation, when you have to THINK about your next move, you will lose. Practice. When you react correctly AUTOMATICALLY, without thinking, then you are ready. Also practice in your mind.

  5. Outstanding common sense for what can sometimes be a brutal world. Three things, not two, are unavoidable in life – death, taxes and idiots/arseholes – and I’m realising how lucky I have been in confrontations in the past. One can’t responsibly rely on luck, so thanks. I’m training.

  6. im getting a bit older now so these technics are short and sharp to get your opponent out the way a great lesson learnt thank you

  7. This is reality in clear easy to follow steps the video dems are brilliant. And I will be practicing them both mentally and physically ty again.

  8. Thank you for these great tips explained very clearly in your demonstrations. I’ve never been in a fight and having a few techniques to develop will help my muscle memory in case I would run into these type of encounters.

  9. Better to have a plan than no plan
    You have to be fast hard and above all simple
    You have to keep going till the guy is finished
    Rather stand in a court of law and explain that suck food through a straw in a hospital bed or worse
    Hit first
    Eyes and groin
    Be brutal
    Be safe

  10. I really enjoyed watching the “students” in the first video and seeing how the instructor corrected their moves. Thank you for the tips on practicing.

  11. Triangle choke is excellent but the handgun disarm is crap and will get someone killed. In real life the bozo with the gun will not leave his arm at full extension while you tap it to the side so you can bring your passive hand up to grab the weapon. If you must try grab the bloody barrel first after you distract as you have control of the weapon and the gunman wont be able to pull his hand back out of reach and shoot you dead.

  12. Great practical techniques in small sessions. It is easy to get overwhelmed with too much material at a time.

  13. These videos are awesome, very well directed, and the execution of the techniques is easy to see and realize.

  14. In All Honesty Am A Trained Karate Student But Having Seen The Course Understand Now That There Is No Thing As A One On One Fight Anymore If Even A One On One Fair Fight Exists Even Which It Does Not At All In Reality. But Now Like Michael Said Having Been Trained My Self In Karate This Makes More Confident About Fighting Someone One On One Or In A Group Or Gang Setting On The Street Because Now I Realize The Harsh Truth And Reality There Are Rules In The Ring But On The Streets There Are No Rules On The Streets, The Only Rule Is When Fighting On The Streets Is Kill Or Be Killed When It Comes To Street Fighting.

  15. Looks a awesome move looks class have to recomend it to some one who I know or any one else like that a class technique.

  16. Awesome made me think different about a fight now. Have always been told there is some bigger an stronger that can beat you. Now after seeing this video ( and thank you ) I’m more confident in myself as I have been trained in boxing, judo an karate but have had doubts in fighting someone or a group in a street fight because there is no rules. Thx for opening up my mind

  17. Awesome made me think different about a fight now. Have always been told there is some bigger an stronger that can beat you. Now after seeing this video ( and thank you ) I’m more confident in myself as I have been trained in boxing, judo an karate but have had doubts in fighting someone or a group in a street fight because there is no rules. Thx for opening up my mind

  18. I love the short class. I have told people since I was a youngster that there is no such thing as a fair fight and the winner is normally the one who hits first and most. Even though I understand this practice, your5 lessons just made me aware of some things that will help if the need ever arises again. I was attacked at a bar not long ago by a 25 year old stud that wanted to show off to his buddies. He ran his mouth and before he ever got started, I throat punched him and after2 quick elbows it was over. They were all shocked and surprised and I was able to get my girlfriend and my 50 yr old butt out with no more trouble. Your absolutely correct in your teaching. I’m not nearly as big or strong as a 25 yr old football player, but I will quickly dispatch him as long as I stay true to what I have been taught. Work smarter not harder. Lol. Thanks for the info!!!

  19. i have trained tong long for 29 yrs we have similar ideas ,but yours is straight to the point using less technics i like it alot specially the part about the gun take down i am interested in learning more regards scott

  20. Thank you fo bringing back moves I’d forgotten. I was in the Rhodesian Light Infantry, Special Forces, we did a lot of hand to hand and behind enemy lines bush warfare. Gary

  21. These are effective and look to be easy moves that seem to do real damage. One thing I’d like to say is – I am a female and I would like to see this perspective shown on the effectiveness that women can do this as well. Yes there are no rules on the street especially for a woman and a larger attacker. The scare tactic is a big factor in being attacked or raped. Would love to see more especially with a female instructor showing a woman’s advantage point. These situations don’t always apply just with man, they look for easy targeted women until they find out otherwise. I want to be the otherwise!

  22. I enjoyed watching these 5 lessons. They are real good to learn and practice. These lessons plus the “Brutal Fight Enders” techniques are very valuable and easy to learn in a short time. I practice them with my wife and we are both confident that we can defend ourselves against any attacks. We needed these lessons specially we live in the urban area where violence is a daily occurance. Thank you very much for your generosity by offering these lessons free of charge.

1 6 7 8